The Magnifying Glass Films

A primary goal of the Magnifying Glass grant is the creation of accessible short social justice documentaries that can be easily shared, allowing the message of the films to spread. Watch the completed films of past grantees below, share the message, get involved (and check back to find out when the Magnifying Glass grant will open for your state!)


Louisiana 2016

FIRST

Directors ANNIE FREITAS & EMILY MACKENZIE
Producer SASHA SOLODUKHINA
Cinematographer JUSTIN ZWEIFACH
Editor EMILY MACKENZIE

FIRST is a portrait of Dolfinette Martin, a formerly incarcerated mother of five children and a community organizer in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dolfinette was the first in her family to be incarcerated. At age 45, she was also the first to graduate from college. Despite overwhelming bureaucratic and personal obstacles, Dolfinette graduated with an Associate Degree in Applied Sciences in 2015. Now, she wants to help other women who have been in prison to accomplish their educational goals and find not just a job, but a career.

 

After Claudetteia

Director PHILIP H. WILLIAMSON, JR.
Producers JAIME BLANSON & JONATHAN ISAAC JACKSON

After Claudetteia centers on life for queer students and teachers in the Monroe City School system after openly queer student Claudetteia Love made nationwide headlines in 2015 for challenging a discriminatory school policy that barred her from wearing a tuxedo to prom.

 


Georgia 2016

No Safe Space

Director KAREN E. WINK
Producers JENNIFER JACOB BROWN & KAREN E. WINK

The state of Georgia has no hate crime law, providing no way to track violent crimes against members of the LGBTQ community, no appropriate punishment, and leaving many victims without a path to closure. “No Safe Space” is a video and pront resource documenting LGBTQ violence in Georgia. The shorts detail what victims went through, how the lack of a hate crime law prevented a fitting punishment from being carried out and kept the attackers’ targeting of LGBTQ victims off the record, and, most importantly, what this shortcoming in the law has meant to the victims – their frustration, their distress, and their continued fear.

Visit the website and see the finished film: www.nosafespacega.com